• Brooks writes daily and teaches frequently. As CEO at Forisk, he’s published hundreds of blogs and analyses related to forestry. As a fiction writer, he’s collected hundreds of rejection slips (and published a few stories…)
  • Brooks Mendell is the author of books including Loving Trees is Not Enough, Forest Finance Simplified, and Beaverball: A (Winning) Season with the MIT Baseball Team.
  • Brooks delivers 40 to 50 presentations annually. His expertise includes the business of forestry and the practice of effective communication. He delivered keynotes, facilitated panels and taught workshops in countries including Australia, Canada, Colombia, New Zealand, the United States, and Uruguay.
  • Brooks started his forestry career while at MIT as an intern with the State Forester in Massachusetts. Later, he worked at a logging camp in Raymond, Washington, at a sawmill in Barnesville, Georgia, and at a National Park in Northern California.

  • At MIT, Brooks was co-Captain and co-MVP of the 1993 ECAC Champion Varsity Baseball Team. While he almost failed out of MIT as a freshman, he ultimately graduated with Academic All-American and NCAA Postgraduate Scholar honors.
  • At UC Berkeley, Brooks received a full tuition MBA Scholarship. While there, he was named an Outstanding Graduate Student Instructor for his work in Communication Skills, won the 20th Haas Speech Competition on Sustainable Business, and was selected by his classmates to deliver the MBA Commencement Address.
  • After earning a PhD in Forest Finance in two and a half years at the University of Georgia, Brooks received a Fulbright Scholarship to teach courses on forest finance and risk management (in Spanish) in Uruguay.
  • In 2004, Brooks Mendell founded Forisk Consulting, an award-winning research firm that studies forest operations and timber markets. Forisk subscribers own and manage over 100 million timberland acres, and account for nearly 40% of the annual wood use in North America. Leading media outlets – including The Wall Street Journal, New York Times, and National Public Radio – cite Forisk’s analysis.